ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD

MANUSCRIPT AND DISKETTE

PREPARATION GUIDE

 

 

If you are submitting your manuscript on diskette, there are some special guidelines you must to follow so that we can work with your diskettes. If you have any questions about these guidelines, please contact your acquisitions editor or the production department.

Please submit two double-spaced printouts and your diskettes for copyediting. The printouts must be the same version of the manuscript that is on the diskettes. Do not add handwritten corrections to the manuscript. If you need to update or revise the manuscript before submission, please make the changes to the disks and print out a new copy of the manuscript. When copyediting is done, we will return the copyedited manuscript to you and ask you to review and approve the changes. At that point you can mark the necessary changes onto the edited manuscript, and the copyeditor will incorporate them into the final version of the file.

 

Software guidelines

Our typesetters can accept disks in both PC and Mac format. They are competent to handle a wide range of word processing programs; however, should you wish to use a program other than Word or WordPerfect, please call to verify that we can accept diskettes in other formats as we may have trouble working with very new or little-known programs. If your text includes numerous accents (diacritical marks) please discuss this with your acquisitions editor as this may affect the typesetting process. Please do not use RTF (rich text format); it often causes trouble. Also, please submit multiple disks if necessary, rather than saving the entire manuscript on one disk as a compressed file. Make sure that your disks are high density (HD) rather than double density (DD).

We request that editors of collective works submit all parts of their book in the same word processing program. If you believe this will be prohibitively difficult for you, please call a production editor for further advice.

Save each chapter and section of front matter or end matter in a separate file on the diskette. Use file names that are easily recognized, such as "chap1" for the first chapter, "contents" for the contents, "biblio" for the bibliography, etc. Pages should be numbered consecutively, rather than beginning with "1" for each chapter.

 

 

Word Processing Tips

 

Subheadings

Type subheadings as follows (samples follow:

This Is an A Subhead

This Is a B Subhead

This Is a C Subhead

 

It is okay for a subheading to be the last line on a manuscript page—this will be adjusted in typesetting.

Subheadings are used to make your organization clear to your readers. There should be no need for more than three levels of subheads, and you may not have that many, or any at all, depending on the type of book (textbooks must have subheadings). Subheadings are capitalized the same way book titles are: The first and last words are always capitalized, as are all other words except articles (the, an, etc.), prepositions (through, in, etc.), and coordinating conjunctions (and, or, etc.).

 

Notes

Rowman & Littlefield prefers notes at the end of each chapter or gathered together at the end of the book instead of footnotes. Please discuss note placement with your acquisitions editor before making a final decision. When you type the notes, indent the first line of each note using a tab and use a normal size numeral followed by a period, not a superscript numeral. Double-space all notes so the copyeditor can read and mark them easily; title the section "Notes."

Here is the correct way to format several types of notes. For note formats not covered here (dissertations, etc.) see Chicago Manual of Style, 14th edition.

For a book:

1. Laurie Kain Hart, Time, Religion, and Social Experience in Rural Greece (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1992), 242-43.

(notice no "p." before page numbers)

2. Robert J. Donia and John V. A. Fine, Jr., Bosnia and Hercegovina: A Tradition Betrayed (New York: Columbia University Press, 1994), 15-21.

(notice no state abbreviation with a major city; consult Chicago Manual of Style for cities needing no states and for proper state abbreviations, e.g. Tenn., not TN)

3. Daniel M. Shea and John C. Green, eds., The State of the Parties: The Changing Role of Contemporary American Parties (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1994), 33-35.

For a chapter from an edited collection:

4. Gary A. Olson and Evelyn Ashton-Jones, "The Politics of Gendered Sponsorship: Mentoring in the Academy," in Gender and Academe, ed. Sara Munson Deats and Lagretta Tallent Lenker (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1994), 231-46.

(notice that the editors’ names follow the title of the collection)

For an article in a journal:

5. Jane R. Bush, "Rhetoric and the Instinct for Survival," Political Perspectives 29, no. 3 (March 1990): 45-53.

(notice colon after date; no "p." before page numbers)

For an article in a newspaper:

6. Michael Norman, "The Once-Simple Folk Tale Analyzed by Academe," New York Times, 5 March 1984, 15(N).

(notice no "The" before New York Times; include date and page number)

For a paper read at a conference:

7. Eviatar Zerubavel, "The Benedictine Ethic and the Spirit of Scheduling" (paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Society for the Comparative Study of Civilizations, Milwaukee, Wis., April 1978), 17-19.

For an internet source:

8. Lauren P. Burka, "A Hypertext History of Multi-User Dimensions," MUD History 1993, <http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/1pb/mud-history.html> (5 Dec. 1994).

(notice the date the website was accessed is included at the end of the reference)

 

For repeated references to the same work within a chapter, use short form references after the first reference. Do not use ibid. and op. cit. Examples:


1. Laurie Kain Hart, Time, Religion, and Social Experience in Rural Greece (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1992), 242-43.

2. Hart, Time, Religion, 246.

3. Gary A. Olson and Evelyn Ashton-Jones, "The Politics of Gendered Sponsorship: Mentoring in the Academy," in Gender and Academe, ed. Sara Munson Deats and Lagretta Tallent Lenker (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1994), 231-46.

4. Hart, Time, Religion, 242.

5. Olson and Ashton-Jones, "Gendered Sponsorship," 236.

Please truncate page numbers in the following style: 1-5, 10-11, 15-19, 100-101, 105-9, 147-48. For note formats not covered here (dissertations, conference papers, etc.) see Chicago Manual of Style, 14th edition.

 

Bibliography

Here are sample formats for bibliography entries:

Burka, Lauren P. "A Hypertext History of Multi-User Dimensions." MUD History. 1993. <http://www.ccs.neu.edu/home/1pb/mud-history.html> (5 Dec. 1994).

Bush, Jane R. "Rhetoric and the Instinct for Survival." Political Perspectives 29, no. 3 (March 1990): 45-53.

Friedman, Marilyn, and Jan Narveson. Political Correctness: For and Against. 2d ed. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1995.

Hart, Laurie Kain. Time, Religion, and Social Experience in Rural Greece. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1992.

Milwaukee Journal, 8 February-12 March 1990.

(notice that a date range will suffice for a newspaper, especially where numerous articles have been used)

Olson, Gary A., and Evelyn Ashton-Jones. "The Politics of Gendered Sponsorship: Mentoring in the Academy." Pp. 231-46 in Gender and Academe, edited by Sara Munson Deats and Lagretta Tallent Lenker. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1994.

Tortelli, Anthony B., ed. Sociology Approaching the Twenty-First Century. Los Angeles: Peter and Sons, 1991.

Zerubavel, Eviatar. "The Benedictine Ethic and the Spirit of Scheduling." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Society for the Comparative Study of Civilizations, Milwaukee, Wis., April 1978.

 

For repeated entries by same author, do not repeat the author’s name—replace it with a long dash (3-em dash). But if the author wrote the piece with someone else, you must list both names again.

For multiple entries by the same author, Chicago style prefers that you order each entry by date. We will also accept arranging the multiple entries in alphabetical order.

Bush, Jane R. "Rhetoric and the Instinct for Survival." Political Perspectives 29, no. 3 (March 1990): 45–53.

———. The Rhetoric of Politics. New York: Free Press, 1989.

———, ed. Politics and Rhetoric. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 1992.

Bush, Jane R., and Martin Jones. "Rhetoric in the Academy." Chronicle of Higher Education 37, no. 7 (July 1994): 32-35.

 

Artwork

All artwork, including line art, maps, charts, graphs, equations, and photographs, must be provided in camera-ready form. If artwork is being prepared for the book, it should be created to measure no more than 4½ inches wide and 7½ inches long and should include the figure number and caption. If the artwork already exists (photographs, maps being taken—with permission—from another book), you must make sure that it is clean and will reproduce well. If it is larger than 4½ by 7½ inches, try reducing it on a photocopier. Sometimes when you reduce a map enough to fit the text area the type on the map is so small it is illegible. If this is the case, you will have to have the map (chart, etc.) redrawn. Tables should be provided on disk in files separate from the main text.

Please double-number figures by chapter for easy reference. For example, if you have three tables and two figures in chapter 3, they would be table 3.1, table 3.2, table 3.3, figure 3.1, and figure 3.2. Be sure to place callouts in your text to direct readers to tables, figures, or artwork as needed.

You should produce each piece of art (maps, line art, equations, etc.) on a separate page, using a laser printer that prints at least 600 dpi. Mark the figure with the correct manuscript page number using a non-reproducible blue pen or pencil and indicate in the manuscript where you would like each figure to appear. Keep all original figures together in a folder or 9" x 12" envelope—do not staple, tape, or paperclip them to the manuscript pages.

Please provide a separate list of figures, tables, and artwork along with the manuscript page numbers that each is to appear on.

We strongly prefer to receive the original art and scan it ourselves, in order to ensure that scans are created at optimal settings for the printer who will be printing the book and the type of paper the book will be printed on. However, if you wish to submit artwork on disk, contact your acquisitions editor to determine if your disk format is acceptable.

 

 

 

Line Art/Maps

 

Photographs

 

Tables

 

Equations

 

Before you submit your final manuscript